Wednesday, April 20, 2011

TOP FIVE MOST POPULAR FICTIONAL RABBITS

Time for an Easter Related Entry. Listed below are five famous fictional rabbits. By the way, my siblings and I were making Easter Related art crafts too, you can check our Art Blog Here if you have time. Before we proceed with our Top Five, here are some fictional rabbits that failed to make it on Top Five but deserves a special mention.
E.B from the 2011 Film Hop
Peter Rabbit
Thumper from the Disney Film Bambi
Lola Bunny from Film Space Jam and Looney Tunes
Roger Rabbit from Who Framed Roger Rabbit

TOP FIVE MOST POPULAR FICTIONAL RABBITS

TOP 5 MOST POPULAR FICTIONAL RABBIT
"MARCH HARE"
(FROM ALICE IN WONDERLAND)


The March Hare is a character most famous for appearing in the tea party scene in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Like the character's friend, the Hatter, the March Hare feels compelled to always behave as though it is tea-time because the Hatter supposedly "murdered the time" whilst singing for the Queen of Hearts. Sir John Tenniel's illustration also shows him with straw on his head, a common way to depict madness in Victorian times. The Disney version of the character was also a semi-regular on Bonkers and one of the guests in House of Mouse, often seen seated with the Mad Hatter. March Hare also appeared in 2010 Disney's Alice in Wonderland. In the movie, the March Hare behaves as if constantly nerve-wracked and completely delirious. He is a cook in the film, and the way he eccentrically throws dishes and pots suggests he is an amalgam of both the March Hare and the cook from Lewis Carroll's original book.


TOP 4 MOST POPULAR RABBIT
"RABBIT"

(FROM WINNIE THE POOH)

In the fictional world of the book series and cartoons Winnie-the-Pooh, Rabbit is a responsible rabbit who happens to be a good friend of Winnie-the-Pooh. He is always practical and keeps his friends on their toes, although they sometimes raise his ire unintentionally. Rabbit appears in most Disney Winnie the Pooh cartoons. He is usually a normal individual, but played the role of the main antagonist in two features, Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too and Pooh's Heffalump Movie. He sang a total of two songs which could be considered "villain songs," namely "If It Says So" in Pooh's Grand Adventure: The Search for Christopher Robin, and "The Horridly Hazardous Heffalumps" in Pooh's Heffalump Movie. As an addition to his character, he likes his garden and does whatever he can to protect it from other animals such as bugs and crows. He gets cross and grumpy when they try to steal his vegetables, especially carrots. By the way, when i was a kid, I thought Piglet is also a bunny LOL.



TOP 3 MOST POPULAR RABBIT
"OSWALD THE RABBIT"
(FROM OSWALD THE LUCKY RABBIT)


Oswald the Lucky Rabbit is an anthropomorphic rabbit and animated cartoon character created by Ub Iwerks and Walt Disney for films distributed by Universal Pictures in the 1920s and 1930s. Oswald the Lucky Rabbit was introduced in 1927 after Disney's series of Alice Comedies had run its course. Disney signed a new contract with Universal Studios head Carl Laemmle where he would produce a series of cartoons for Charles Mintz and George Winkler. The first Oswald cartoon, Poor Papa, was rejected by the Universal studio heads due to poor production quality and the sloppiness and age of Oswald. After this, Disney, together with Ub Iwerks, created a second cartoon called Trolley Troubles featuring a much younger, neater Oswald. The short officially launched the series and proved to be Disney's greatest success yet. Poor Papa was finally released a year later. In the spring of 1928, with the series going strong, Disney asked Mintz for an increase in the budget. But Mintz instead demanded that Walt take a 20 percent budget cut, and as leverage, he reminded Disney that Universal owned the character, and revealed that he had already signed most of Disney's current employees to his new contract: Iwerks and Les Clark were among the few who remained loyal to Walt. Disney refused Mintz's demand, disassociating himself from Oswald after the series' first season. While finishing the remaining Oswald cartoons, Disney, Iwerks and Clark created the cartoon hero who would become The Walt Disney Company's lasting symbol: Mickey Mouse (a slightly altered Oswald the Rabbit to avoid litigation), the most famous of Walt Disney's characters.


TOP 2 MOST POPULAR RABBIT
"THE WHITE RABBIT"

(FROM ALICE IN WONDERLAND)


The White Rabbit is a fictional character in Lewis Carroll's book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. He appears at the very beginning of the book, in chapter one, wearing a waistcoat, and muttering "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!" Alice follows him down the rabbit hole into Wonderland. Alice encounters him again when he mistakes her for his housemaid Mary Ann and she becomes trapped in his house after growing too large. The Rabbit shows up again in the last few chapters, as a herald-like servant of the King and Queen of Hearts. In Disney's animated version of the book, the Rabbit seems to have the most logic out of all the Wonderland characters. The Disney Rabbit made a few appearances on the Disney Channel original show, House of Mouse. His most noticeable appearance was when he confessed to Clarabelle Cow that "I'm not really late, and I don't really have a date. I'm a fraud!". In the show's intro, he is grabbed by the reservation clerk Daisy Duck.
The White Rabbit IN 2010 Alice in Wonderland film works for the Red Queen, but is also a secret member of the Underland Underground Resistance, and was sent by the Hatter to search for Alice


THE MOST POPULAR RABBIT
"BUGS BUNNY"

(FROM LOONEY TUNES)

No body can get the throne from being the most famous rabbit other than Bugs Bunny. Bugs Bunny is a fictional main character who starred in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated films. He is the most prominent of the Looney Tunes characters as his calm, flippant insouciance endeared him to American audiences during and after World War II. Bugs has feuded with Elmer Fudd, Yosemite Sam, Willoughby the Dog, Marvin the Martian, Beaky Buzzard, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Tasmanian Devil, Cecil Turtle, Charlie Dog, Witch Hazel, Rocky and Mugsy, Wile E. Coyote, the Crusher, Gremlin, Big Bad Wolf, Count Blood Count and a host of others. Bugs almost always wins these conflicts, a plot pattern which recurs in Looney Tunes films directed by Chuck Jones. Concerned that viewers would lose sympathy for an aggressive protagonist who always won, Jones arranged for Bugs to be bullied, cheated, or threatened by the antagonists while minding his own business, justifying his subsequent antics as retaliation or self-defense. The carrot-chewing scenes are generally followed by Bugs Bunny's most well-known catchphrase, "What's up, Doc?", which was written by director Tex Avery for his first Bugs Bunny short, 1940's A Wild Hare. Avery explained later that it was a common expression in his native Texas and that he did not think much of the phrase. In 2002, TV Guide compiled a list of the 50 greatest cartoon characters of all time as part of the magazine's 50th anniversary. Bugs Bunny was given the honor of number 1.




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